Monday, January 16, 2017

Found this...... AN AMAZING STORY... Here An Amazing Story From A Flight Attendant On Delta Flight 15

AN AMAZING STORY... from a flight attendant on Delta Flight 15, written following 9-11:

On the morning of Tuesday, September 11, we were about 5 hours out of Frankfurt, flying over the North Atlantic .

All of a sudden the curtains parted and I was told to go to the cockpit, immediately, to see the captain. As soon as I got there I noticed that the crew had that "All Business" look on their faces. The captain handed me a printed message. It was from Delta's main office in Atlanta and simply read, "All airways over the Continental United States are closed to commercial air traffic. Land ASAP at the nearest airport. Advise your destination."

No one said a word about what this could mean. We knew it was a serious situation and we needed to find terra firma quickly. The captain determined that the nearest airport was 400 miles behind us in Gander, New Foundland.

He requested approval for a route change from the Canadian traffic controller and approval was granted immediately -- no questions asked. We found out later, of course, why there was no hesitation in approving our request.

While the flight crew prepared the airplane for landing, another message arrived from Atlanta telling us about some terrorist activity in the New York area. A few minutes later word came in about the hijackings.

We decided to LIE to the passengers while we were still in the air. We told them the plane had a simple instrument problem and that we needed to land at the nearest airport in Gander , New Foundland, to have it checked out.

We promised to give more information after landing in Gander .. There was much grumbling among the passengers, but that's nothing new! Forty minutes later, we landed in Gander. Local time at Gander was 12:30 PM .... that's 11:00 AM EST.

There were already about 20 other airplanes on the ground from all over the world that had taken this detour on their way to the US.

After we parked on the ramp, the captain made the following announcement: "Ladies and gentlemen, you must be wondering if all these airplanes around us have the same instrument problem as we have. The reality is that we are here for another reason."

Then he went on to explain the little bit we knew about the situation in the US. There were loud gasps and stares of disbelief. The captain informed passengers that Ground control in Gander told us to stay put.

The Canadian Government was in charge of our situation and no one was allowed to get off the aircraft. No one on the ground was allowed to come near any of the air crafts. Only airport police would come around periodically, look us over and go on to the next airplane.

In the next hour or so more planes landed and Gander ended up with 53 airplanes from all over the world, 27 of which were US commercial jets.

Meanwhile, bits of news started to come in over the aircraft radio and for the first time we learned that airplanes were flown into the World Trade Center in New York and into the Pentagon in DC.

People were trying to use their cell phones, but were unable to connect due to a different cell system in Canada . Some did get through, but were only able to get to the Canadian operator who would tell them that the lines to the U.S. were either blocked or jammed.

Sometime in the evening the news filtered to us that the World Trade Center buildings had collapsed and that a fourth hijacking had resulted in a crash. By now the passengers were emotionally and physically exhausted, not to mention frightened, but everyone stayed amazingly calm.

We had only to look out the window at the 52 other stranded aircraft to realize that we were not the only ones in this predicament.

We had been told earlier that they would be allowing people off the planes one plane at a time. At 6 PM, Gander airport told us that our turn to deplane would be 11 am the next morning.

Passengers were not happy, but they simply resigned themselves to this news without much noise and started to prepare themselves to spend the night on the airplane.

Gander had promised us medical attention, if needed, water, and lavatory servicing.

And they were true to their word.

Fortunately we had no medical situations to worry about. We did have a young lady who was 33 weeks into her pregnancy. We took REALLY good care of her. The night passed without incident despite the uncomfortable sleeping arrangements.

About 10:30 on the morning of the 12th a convoy of school buses showed up. We got off the plane and were taken to the terminal where we went through Immigration and Customs and then had to register with the Red Cross.

After that we (the crew) were separated from the passengers and were taken in vans to a small hotel. We had no idea where our passengers were going. We learned from the Red Cross that the town of Gander has a population of 10,400 people and they had about 10,500 passengers to take care of from all the airplanes that were forced into Gander!

We were told to just relax at the hotel and we would be contacted when the US airports opened again, but not to expect that call for a while.

We found out the total scope of the terror back home only after getting to our hotel and turning on the TV, 24 hours after it all started.

Meanwhile, we had lots of time on our hands and found that the people of Gander were extremely friendly. They started calling us the "plane people." We enjoyed their hospitality, explored the town of Gander and ended up having a pretty good time.

Two days later, we got that call and were taken back to the Gander airport. Back on the plane, we were reunited with the passengers and found out what they had been doing for the past two days.

What we found out was incredible.....

Gander and all the surrounding communities (within about a 75 Kilometer radius) had closed all high schools, meeting halls, lodges, and any other large gathering places. They converted all these facilities to mass lodging areas for all the stranded travelers.

Some had cots set up, some had mats with sleeping bags and pillows set up.

ALL the high school students were required to volunteer theirtime to take care of the "guests."

Our 218 passengers ended up in a town called Lewisporte, about 45 kilometers from Gander where they were put up in a high school. If any women wanted to be in a women-only facility, that was arranged.

Families were kept together. All the elderly passengers were taken to private homes.

Remember that young pregnant lady? She was put up in a private home right across the street from a 24-hour Urgent Care facility.There was a dentist on call and both male and female nurses remained with the crowd for the duration.

Phone calls and e-mails to the U.S. and around the world were available to everyone once a day. During the day, passengers were offered "Excursion" trips.
Some people went on boat cruises of the lakes and harbors. Some went for hikes in the local forests.

Local bakeries stayed open to make fresh bread for the guests.

Food was prepared by all the residents and brought to the schools. People were driven to restaurants of their choice and offered wonderful meals. Everyone was given tokens for local laundry mats to wash their clothes, since luggage was still on the aircraft.

In other words, every single need was met for those stranded travelers.

Passengers were crying while telling us these stories. Finally, when they were told that U.S. airports had reopened, they were delivered to the airport right on time and without a single passenger missing or late. The local Red Cross had all the information about thewhereabouts of each and every passenger and knew
which plane they needed to be on and when all the planes were leaving. They coordinated everything beautifully.

It was absolutely incredible.

When passengers came on board, it was like they had been on a cruise. Everyone knew each other by name. They were swapping stories of their stay, impressing each other with who had the better time. Our flight back to Atlanta looked like a chartered party flight. The crew just stayed out of their way. It was mind-boggling.

Passengers had totally bonded and were calling each other by their first names, exchanging phone numbers, addresses, and email addresses.

And then a very unusual thing happened.

One of our passengers approached me and asked if he could make an announcement over the PA system. We never, ever allow that. But this time was different. I said "of course" and handed him the mike. He picked up the PA and reminded everyone about what they had just gone through in the last few days.
He reminded them of the hospitality they had received at the hands of total strangers.

He continued by saying that he would like to do something in return for the good folks of Lewisporte.

"He said he was going to set up a Trust Fund under the name of DELTA 15 (our flight number). The purpose of the trust fund is to provide college scholarships for the high school students of Lewisporte.

He asked for donations of any amount from his fellow travelers. When the paper with donations got back to us with the amounts, names, phone numbers and addresses, the total was for more than $14,000!

"The gentleman, a MD from Virginia , promised to match the donations and to start the administrative work on the scholarship. He also said that he would forward this proposal to Delta Corporate and ask them to donate as well.

As I write this account, the trust fund is at more than $1.5 million and has assisted 134 students in college education.

"I just wanted to share this story because we need good stories right now. It gives me a little bit of hope to know that some people in a faraway place were kind to some strangers who literally dropped in on them.

It reminds me how much good there is in the world."

"In spite of all the rotten things we see going on in today's world this story confirms that there are still a lot of good people in the world and when things get bad, they will come forward.

Monday, April 18, 2016

My Teacher - Mrs. Maryam

Her name was Mrs. Maryam. As she stood in front of her 5th grade class on the very first day of school, she told the children a lie.

Like most teachers, she looked at her students and said that she loved them all the same. But that was impossible, because there in the front row, slumped in his seat, was a little boy named Taahir Sulayman.

Mrs. Maryam had watched Taahir the year before and noticed that he didn’t play well with the other children that his clothes were messy and that he constantly needed a bath. And Taahir could be unpleasant. It got to the point where Mrs. Maryam would actually take delight in marking his papers with a broad red pen, making bold X’s and then putting a big “F” at the top of his papers.

At the school where Mrs. Maryam taught, she was required to review each child’s past records and she put Taahir’s off until last. However, when she reviewed his file, she was in for a surprise.

Taahir’s first grade teacher wrote, “Taahir is a bright child with a ready laugh. He does his work neatly and has good manners…he is a joy to be around.”

His second grade teacher wrote, “Taahir is an excellent student, well liked by his classmates, but he is troubled because his mother has a terminal illness and life at home must be a struggle.”

His third grade teacher wrote, “His mother’s death has been hard on him. He tries to do his best, but his father doesn’t show much interest and his home life will soon affect him if some steps aren’t taken.”

Taahir’s fourth grade teacher wrote, “Taahir is withdrawn and doesn’t show much interest in school. He doesn’t have many friends and he sometimes sleeps in class.”

By now, Mrs. Maryam realized the problem and she was ashamed of herself. She felt even worse when her students brought her Eid presents, wrapped in beautiful ribbons and bright paper, except for Taahir’s.

His present was clumsily wrapped in the heavy, brown paper that he got from a grocery bag. Mrs. Maryam took pains to open it in the middle of the other presents. Some of the children started to laugh when she found a rhinestone bracelet with some of the stones missing, and a bottle that was one quarter full of perfume.

But she stifled the children’s laughter when she exclaimed how pretty the bracelet was, putting it on, and dabbing some of the perfume on her wrist. Taahir Sulayman stayed after school that day just long enough to say, “Mrs. Maryam, today you smelled just like my Mom used to.”

After the children left she cried for at least an hour. On that very day, she quit teaching reading, and writing, and arithmetic. Instead, she began to teach children.

Mrs. Maryam paid particular attention to Taahir. As she worked with him, his mind seemed to come alive. The more she encouraged him, the faster he responded. By the end of the year, Taahir had become one of smartest children in the class and, despite her lie that she would love all the children the same, Taahir became one of her “teacher’s pets.”

A year later, she found a note under her door, from Taahir, telling her that she was still the best teacher he ever had in his whole life.

Six years went by before she got another note from Taahir. He then wrote that he had finished high school, third in his class, and she was still the best teacher he ever had in his whole life.

Four years after that, she got another letter, saying that while things had been tough at times, he’d stayed in school, had stuck with it, and would soon graduate from college with the highest of honors. He assured Mrs. Maryam that she was still the best and favorite teacher he ever had in his whole life.
Then four more years passed and yet another letter came. This time he explained that after he got his bachelor’s degree, he decided to go a little further. The letter explained that she was still the best and favorite teacher he ever had. But now his name was a little longer — the letter was signed,

Taahir F. Sulayman, MD.

The story doesn’t end there. You see, there was yet another letter that spring. Taahir said he’d met this girl and was going to be married. He explained that his father had died a couple of years ago and he was wondering if Mrs. Maryam might agree to sit in, as his “mother” at the wedding.

Of course, Mrs. Maryam did. And guess what? She wore that bracelet, the one with several rhinestones missing. And she made sure she was wearing the perfume that Taahir remembered his mother wearing on their last Eid together. They hugged each other, and Dr. Taahir whispered in Mrs. Maryam’s ear, “Thank you Mrs. Maryam for believing in me. Thank you so much for making me feel important and showing me that I could make a difference.”

Mrs. Maryam, with tears in her eyes, whispered back. She said,”Taahir,you have it all wrong. You were the one who taught me that I could make a difference. I didn’t really know how to teach until I met you.”

Please remember that wherever you go, and whatever you do, you will have the opportunity to touch and/or change a person’s outlook.

Please try to do it in a positive way. Our Teachers, Friends, Family, parents, spouses and our children are there, to lift us to our feet when our feet have trouble, remembering how to crawl. Make a positive step and assist someone to take the first steps.

Adapted and edited from Habiba Mamman Lagos' Blog.

Saturday, January 23, 2016

My Dear Nigerian Youths - Professor Isa

I am very angry and that is why I am addressing you. You are the source of my anger and I want to vent my spleen- maybe not at you directly- but at the arrogance of your ignorance. 

You sit in front of a computer and rant all day through social media but with every click, you make money - not for yourself - but for Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook). 

With every megabyte of data you spend complaining and maligning, you make stupendous bucks for Etisalat, Glo and Airtel.

Over the next two years, the number of Nigerian millionaires will jump by 47% but most likely you will not be among because you are too busy whining and complaining. And yet about 60% of Nigeria’s 170m population are below 35 years. Oh, what a waste! By the way, Mark Zuckerberg was 19 when he started Facebook. 

Africa’s youngest billionaire, Ashish Thakkar, is 31. He escaped from the Rwandan genocide and relocated to Uganda where he started an IT business. Collin Thornton, who made his millions by fixing bad computers and setting up Dial-a-Nerd, is 35.

Adam Horowitz, an 18-year-old entrepreneur, started 30 websites in 3 years before he became successful. The only thing you have ever started is an online petition. 

Have you heard of Jason Njoku?
He’s 33 and the founder of Iroko TV. He received $8m investment into his company just a few years ago. What he does? Sharing the same Nollywood films that you spend hours to watch online. He didn’t just hang around waiting for Buhari to make something happen or blaming Jonathan for not making anything
happen.

Kamal Budhabhatti was deported from Kenya but while on the flight, he thought of the opportunities in Kenya. He found his way back after 6 months and today his company is valued at $30m. He’s 36. 

Have you heard of Chinedu Echeruo? Apple just paid $1b for his app. He’s a Nigerian like you and all he did was attempt to fix a problem. But for you, the only thing you attempt to fix are your nails- and your hairdo! Chinedu moved to New York in 1995 and found it difficult to navigate the city with ease so he developed HopStop to fix the problem. Stop listing all the problems - we know them already but what are you doing about them?

-Awolowo was 37,  Akintola was 36, Ahmadu Bello was 36, Tafawa Balewa was 34, Okotie-Eboh was 27 and Enahoro was 27 at the time of independence of Nigeria. 

In 1966, the first coup was led by Kaduna Nzeogwu (29) and stopped by Murtala Mohammed (28), TY Danjuma (28), IBB (25), Sanni Abacha (23) and Shehu Yar'adua (23).

It brought in Yakubu Gowon as Head of State at 32 and Olusegun Obasanjo at 29. 

You are in your 40s and you still sag your trousers. Of course, you know Linda Ikeji. You’ve spent hundreds of hours on her blog laughing and commenting while she smiles her way to the bank. She’s just built a house for her father in the village- just by you clicking on her gossip and sharing. 

Your day is not complete without a stop by at her blog. She was as broke as you are but she turned a hobby into a business. Are you
that void of understanding?

You think those politicians have any regard for you? 

That is why I referred to the arrogance of your ignorance at the beginning of this diatribe.

-You have a false estimation of yourself. You have an over bloated ego. -You are only as good as an election ticket - pure and simple.-You are only good to be used and discarded like a used ballot paper. Who keeps a used ballot paper anyway? 

That is why they only remember you every four years. You are like a menstrual pad that is only useful during the menstrual period.

A food for thought...🚶

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

50 Rules For Becoming A Great Leader

If becoming a great leader in your own business or organization is your goal, these 50 rules are a good place to start: 

1. Listen to your team. Rule one. Always listen to what your team has to say, even if you don’t like it.

2. Communicate as efficiently as possible. Make your expectations and feelings clear, in the appropriate medium as often as possible.

3. Talk less. Sometimes saying nothing is better than saying just anything.

4. Be an example. Be the type of person you want your team members to be.

5. Be passionate. If you aren’t passionate about your business, you’re in the wrong business.

6. Be consistent. in your behaviors so your team knows what to expect from you.

7. Make firm decisions. Don’t leave things undecided for long, and don’t waver about a decision once you’ve made it.

8. Identify mentors and role models. Find people you can look up to and learn from, and follow them closely.

9. Interfere only when necessary. If you trust your team to do good work, don’t interfere unless absolutely necessary.

10. Know your limits. Don’t extend yourself beyond your means.

11. Know your strengths. If you’re good at resolving disputes, step in and resolve them as often as possible.

12. Know your weaknesses. If there’s something you’re not good at, admit it, and work on it.

13. Don’t make excuses. If you make a mistake, take ownership of it and don’t pass the blame to someone or something else.

14. Accept the unforeseen. You can’t control or predict everything.

15. Choose your partners carefully. Work only with people you can count on and trust.

16. Do good. Commit yourself to being a good person and giving back to the community when possible.

17. Meet new people all the time. Take every opportunity to expand your network and expose yourself to new experiences and perspectives.

18. Stay in touch with your emotions. Don’t be a robot -- let yourself feel.

19. Temper your reactions. Hold back your reactions until you have a moment to clarify your internal thoughts and feelings.

20. Have fun. Take the time to have fun with your team.

21. Research everything. Before making a decision, know the pros and cons -- do your homework.

22. Think everything through. Never exclusively trust your instincts or first reactions.

23. Choose your team carefully. Hire only those you can trust to get the job done (and to get along with others, as well).

24. Prioritize your team. Your team is everything. Give them whatever they need to succeed.

25. Be humble. Don’t get big-headed about your wealth, influence or position as a leader.

26. Forgive mistakes. Everyone makes them.

27. Forgive yourself. Don't beat yourself up too much over anything. Move on.

28. Be rational. Make decisions logically.

29. Be reasonable. Listen to dissenting opinions, and be fair.

30. Make time for what’s important. There’s no such thing as “not having time” for what’s really important in your life. Make the time.

31. Constantly learn. Read as much as you can, and take classes whenever you have the opportunity.

32. Improve everything. Work on improving your approaches, your skills and your processes constantly.

33. Never give up. Don’t throw in the towel when a little extra persistence could put you over the edge.

34. Transform your methods when necessary. If something isn’t working, change your approach.

35. Cut your losses when necessary. If you’re fighting a losing battle, retreat and start again somewhere else (or in a new way).

36. Learn from your mistakes. Try not to make the same mistakes twice.

37. Ground everything with data. Back up all your decisions, opinions and thoughts with hard, objective facts and evidence.

38. Don’t ignore signs of stress. Stress is real and can interfere with your ability to lead. If it starts setting in at abnormal levels, take action to reduce or relieve it.

39. Give feedback. Let your team know what they’re doing well and what needs further improvement.

40. Trust, but verify. Trust your team to get things done, but always follow up to make sure the work is completed.

41. Be approachable. Let people know they can trust you, and open your door to anybody who needs it.

42. Treat everyone equally. Don’t play favorites; it breeds resentment and makes you appear immature as a leader.

43. Don’t pursue close personal relationships with the team. Be on friendly terms, but don’t try to be best friends with everybody. You’re a leader, first and foremost.

44. Get the team together. Use team-building exercises or other excuses to get your team members talking with one other and having fun together.

45. Return favors. If someone helps you, make it your responsibility to pay back the favor -- even if it’s years later.

46. Don’t burn bridges. Never cut a contact completely out of your life.

47. Stay in touch. If team members leave or change roles, stay in contact with them.

48. Don’t sacrifice your personal life. Your personal life is necessary to retain your own mental health. Never sacrifice it for the sake of leadership or professional responsibilities.

49. Enjoy leadership. Try not to stress too much about being a leader. Instead, enjoy all the benifits it offers.

50. Take advice with a grain of salt. Even with these 50 rules! Because nobody knows everything, and no one piece of advice applies to all situations.

Follow these rules, trust your instincts and continually strive for self-improvement. Eventually, through your experiences and your efforts, you’ll become the type of leader most people only aspire to be. 

Best Regards

Emily Jacob

Saturday, September 19, 2015

Sarki Sanusi II Yayi Umrah A Masallacin Ka'abah

Mai Martaba Sarki Muhammadu Sanusi II, ya gudanar da Umrah a jiya a Babban Masallacin Ka'abah.

Sarki Sanusi shi ne Amirul Hajj na kasa na wannan shekara.

Allah ya karbi ibadun mahajjatan da Allah ya basu ikon zuwa aikin Hajjin bana.